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Monday, 20 January 2020 20:31

Integrative Health Solutions

The aim of The Hijama Clinic at Al Ihsaan Health is to bring back the natural healing ability of the human body and support this healing process with wisdom.

Modern Medicine aims not to support the body’s own healing ability but to bypass or replace it, this is the meaning of allopathy and it is the foundation of modern medicine. Modern medicine seeks to replace, control, suppress or eliminate body cells, tissues, organs and processes if they are not functioning properly instead of seeking to assist, support, balance or repair body cells, tissues, organs and processes that can result in the healing of the patient.

The fundamental differences between Islamic Medicine and Allopathic medicine (Modern Medicine):

Islamic Medicine seeks to use invasive and strong medications only as a last resort.

First we use safe, simple remedies and lifestyle advice, we take the time to understand what is causing the illness and we take the time to advise the patient of this.

The second is that we believe in creation, not evolution so we understand that every aspect of the body has been created in what Allah Himself refers to as ahsani taqweem, we therefore are reluctant to just remove or cut things from the body with the premise that it will cause no harm, except in the case where there are no alternatives.

The third is that we believe that Allah has created the body with the innate ability to heal itself, so we work to support this function, not to replace it. A confirmation of this is that when a person is sick they will incline to that which is useful for their health. This is the reason that we find the Nabi of Allah (SAW) has said to this effect that give the patient what food they ask for. We know that foods have a certain taste and function and a person will incline towards that taste or that food which has the function of healing their present illness provided that the food or taste is in itself healthy.

The aim of Islamic Medicine is to take the good and use it to the benefit of mankind. The Nabi (SAW) has said in a hadeeth to this effect that a Muslim takes wisdom from wherever he finds it so the principle of taking the good and what is in conformance with nature from what is available to us in western medicine or any other system for that matter applies here as well.

For this reason we adopt and encourage the aspects of allopathic medicine that are effective especially in the case of serious infection, life threatening injuries, cases of chronic degenerative disease that have gone past the point where it can be reversed with natural medicines and cases where surgery is the only option

The best practitioner will always be the one who makes the most duaa for their patients. By doing this you are admitting to Allah that you cannot cure, you are admitting that Allah is the One who cures. Because of this fikr (concern) and duaa Allah will grant cure to the patient Insha'Allah. At Al Ihsaan Health we hold firmly on these principles.

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

A good night’s rest is something many people dream about in our sleep-deprived 24/7 modern lives.

Now, academics have explained for the first time the mystery of why it is so replenishing to be out like a light – a good night’s sleep can prepare us for the rigours of daily life.

Biologists at the University of Manchester have studied mice to show how the diurnal rhythm, or body clock, can boost the ability to maintain important cell structures during the day. It is hoped the study could one day help unlock some of the mysteries of ageing.

Professor Karl Kadler, lead author of a report published in Nature Cell Biology, said: “Knowing this could have implications on understanding our biology at its most fundamental level. It might give us some deeper insight into how wounds heal, or how we age.”

The university’s discovery throws a light on the body’s extracellular matrix, which provides structural and biochemical support to cells in the form of connective tissue such as bone, skin, tendon and cartilage.

The researchers have discovered the body has two types of ­fibrils – rope-like structures of collagen that are woven by the cells to form tissues.

Thicker fibrils are permanent and stay with us throughout our lives, unchanged from the age of 17. But thinner fibrils break as the body is subjected to the rigours of the day and replenishing when we get a good rest at night.

“It’s intuitive to think our matrix should be worn down by wear and tear, but it isn’t and now we know why. Our body clock makes an element which can be replenished,” Professor Kadler said.

Sleep patterns

Researchers at the same ­university found last year that blue light might not be as disruptive to sleep patterns as previously thought and using cooler lighting in the evening and bright warmer lights in the day may be more beneficial.

“Collagen provides the body with structure and is our most abundant protein, ensuring the integrity, elasticity and strength of the body’s connective tissue,” Professor Kadler said.

 

“It’s intuitive to think our matrix should be worn down by wear and tear, but it isn’t and now we know why. Our body clock makes an element which can be replenished.”

 

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

Sunday, 05 January 2020 10:04

Joint Pain

Many people suffer from joint pain. It affects your ability to work and prevents you from doing tasks that you were capable of doing before. Causes of joint pain are due to injury, arthritis, gout, age related or other disease. It is important to find out what is the cause of your pain so you can treat it properly. Consult your doctor or health advisor before taking any medication or home remedy. Al Ihsaan provides this service. Call 07384811018 for advice.

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

Your heart rate is relatively simple to measure, but most people don’t know how to interpret this health statistic once they’ve determined it. Learning how to find and interpret your heart rate can reveal some fascinating clues about what’s going on inside your body. Measuring your heart rate takes only a minute: You simply find your pulse (most easily located on your neck or the inside of your wrist) and set a timer for 60 seconds. Count the number of times you feel a beat during that minute. That number is your heart rate, which is measured in beats per minute (BPM).

Your heart rate is always in flux. You’ve probably felt it increase when you’ve walked up a flight of stairs or in a stressful moment. It can change for any number of reasons — but there are two useful markers for measurement. Your resting heart rate is your heart rate when you are completely at rest, such as when you are sleeping or lying down (according to the American Heart Association, it should be somewhere between 60 and 100 beats per minute). Your maximal heart rate is your heart rate when you are at your highest possible level of physical effort during exercise. Both of these markers can reveal fascinating clues about your heart.

Of course, you should not use this information to self-diagnose or make any radical lifestyle changes without first talking to a medical professional. And you should always consult your doctor before prescribing yourself any medical advice. That being said, click through the slideshow above for some interesting facts your heart rate can tell you about your health.

source: https://www.msn.com/en-gb/health/mindandbody/what-your-heart-rate-can-tell-you-about-your-health/ss-AAJgfua?ocid=spartandhp

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

Saturday, 19 October 2019 14:23

Rebalance the internal environment

 

Hijama Cupping rebalances the internal environment and removes the toxin build up from the area. This leads to healing and optimum protection. Book Now on 0738481108.

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

Monday, 07 October 2019 14:14

What Is Holistic Medicine?

Holistic medicine is a form of healing that considers the whole person -- body, mind, spirit, and emotions -- in the quest for optimal health and wellness. According to the holistic medicine philosophy, one can achieve optimal health -- the primary goal of holistic medicine practice -- by gaining proper balance in life.

Holistic medicine practitioners believe that the whole person is made up of interdependent parts and if one part is not working properly, all the other parts will be affected. In this way, if people have imbalances (physical, emotional, or spiritual) in their lives, it can negatively affect their overall health.

A holistic doctor may use all forms of health care, from conventional medication to alternative therapies, to treat a patient. For example, when a person suffering from migraine headaches pays a visit to a holistic doctor, instead of walking out solely with medications, the doctor will likely take a look at all the potential factors that may be causing the person's headaches, such as other health problems, diet and sleep habits, stress and personal problems, and preferred spiritual practices. The treatment plan may involve drugs to relieve symptoms, but also lifestyle modifications to help prevent the headaches from recurring.

Principles of Holistic Medicine

Holistic medicine is also based on the belief that unconditional love and support is the most powerful healer and a person is ultimately responsible for his or her own health and well-being. Other principles of holistic medicine include the following:

  • All people have innate healing powers.
  • The patient is a person, not a disease.
  • Healing takes a team approach involving the patient and doctor, and addresses all aspects of a person's life using a variety of health care practices.
  • Treatment involves fixing the cause of the condition, not just alleviating the symptoms.

Holistic Medicine: Types of Treatments

Holistic practitioners use a variety of treatment techniques to help their patients take responsibility for their own well-being and achieve optimal health. Depending on the practitioner's training, these may include:

 
  • Patient education on lifestyle changes and self-care to promote wellness. This may include diet, exercisepsychotherapy, relationship and spiritual counseling, and more
  • Complementary and alternative therapies such as acupuncturechiropractic care, homeopathy, massage therapy, naturopathy, and others
  • Western medications and surgical procedures

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

Monday, 30 September 2019 21:11

Professional Hijama (Cupping therapy)

Hijama (Cupping Therapy) in an professional environment using the correct tools by experienced practitioners

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

During a cupping treatment, a cup is placed on the skin and then heated or suctioned onto the skin. The cup is often heated with fire using alcohol, herbs, or paper that’s placed directly into the cup. The fire source is removed, and the heated cup is placed with the open side directly on your skin.

Some modern cupping practitioners have shifted to using rubber pumps to create suction versus more traditional heat methods.

When the hot cup is placed on your skin, the air inside the cup cools and creates a vacuum that draws the skin and muscle upward into the cup. Your skin may turn red as the blood vessels respond to the change in pressure.

With dry cupping, the cup is set in place for a set time, usually between 5 and 10 minutes. With wet cupping, cups are usually only in place for a few minutes before the practitioner removes the cup and makes a small incision to draw blood.

After the cups are removed, the practitioner may cover the previously cupped areas with ointment and bandages. This helps prevent infection. Any mild bruising or other marks usually go away within 10 days of the session.

Cupping is sometimes performed along with acupuncture treatments. For best results, you may also want to fast or eat only light meals for two to three hours before your cupping session.

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

Monday, 02 September 2019 14:01

What Is Cupping Therapy?

 What is cupping?

Cupping is a type of alternative therapy that originated in China. It involves placing cups on the skin to create suction. The suction may facilitate healing with blood flow.

Proponents also claim the suction helps facilitate the flow of “qi” in the body. Qi is a Chinese word meaning life force. A famous Taoist alchemist and herbalist, Ge Hong, reportedly first practiced cupping. He lived from A.D. 281 to 341.

Many Taoists believe that cupping helps balance yin and yang, or the negative and positive, within the body. Restoring balance between these two extremes is thought to help with the body’s resistance to pathogens as well as its ability to increase blood flow and reduce pain.

Cupping increases blood circulation to the area where the cups are placed. This may relieve muscle tension, which can improve overall blood flow and promote cell repair. It may also help form new connective tissues and create new blood vessels in the tissue.

People use cupping to complement their care for a host of issues and conditions.

 

Cupping was originally performed using animal horns. Later, the “cups” were made from bamboo and then ceramic. The suction was primarily created through the use of heat. The cups were originally heated with fire and then applied to the skin. As they cooled, the cups drew the skin inside.

Modern cupping is often performed using glass cups that are rounded like balls and open on one end.

There are two main categories of cupping performed today:

  • Dry cupping is a suction-only method.
  • Wet cupping may involve both suction and controlled medicinal bleeding.

Your practitioner, your medical condition, and your preferences will help determine what method is used.

 

During a cupping treatment, a cup is placed on the skin and then heated or suctioned onto the skin. The cup is often heated with fire using alcohol, herbs, or paper that’s placed directly into the cup. The fire source is removed, and the heated cup is placed with the open side directly on your skin.

Some modern cupping practitioners have shifted to using rubber pumps to create suction versus more traditional heat methods.

When the hot cup is placed on your skin, the air inside the cup cools and creates a vacuum that draws the skin and muscle upward into the cup. Your skin may turn red as the blood vessels respond to the change in pressure.

With dry cupping, the cup is set in place for a set time, usually between 5 and 10 minutes. With wet cupping, cups are usually only in place for a few minutes before the practitioner removes the cup and makes a small incision to draw blood.

After the cups are removed, the practitioner may cover the previously cupped areas with ointment and bandages. This helps prevent infection. Any mild bruising or other marks usually go away within 10 days of the session.

Cupping is sometimes performed along with acupuncture treatments. For best results, you may also want to fast or eat only light meals for two to three hours before your cupping session.

 
 

Cupping has been used to treat a wide variety of conditions. It may be particularly effective at easing conditions that create muscle aches and pains.

Since the cups can also be applied to major acupressure points, the practice is possibly effective at treating digestive issues, skin issues, and other conditions commonly treated with acupressure.

2012 review of studiesTrusted Source suggests cupping therapy’s healing power may be more than just a placebo effect. The researchers found that cupping therapy may help with the following conditions, among others:

However, the authors acknowledge that most of the 135 studies they reviewed contain a high level of bias. More studies are needed to assess the true effectiveness of cupping.

There aren’t many side effects associated with cupping. The side effects you may experience will typically occur during your treatment or immediately after.

You may feel lightheaded or dizzy during your treatment. You may also experience sweating or nausea.

After treatment, the skin around the rim of the cup may become irritated and marked in a circular pattern. You may also have pain at incision sites or feel lightheaded or dizzy shortly after your session.

Infection is always a risk after undergoing cupping therapy. The risk is small and usually avoided if your practitioner follows the right methods for cleaning your skin and controlling infection before and after your session.

Other risks include:

  • scarring of the skin
  • hematoma (bruising)

Your practitioner should wear an apron, disposable gloves, and goggles or other eye protection. They should also use clean equipment and have regular vaccines to ensure protection against certain diseases, like hepatitis.

Always research practitioners thoroughly to protect your own safety.

If you experience any of these issues, consult your practitioner. They may offer remedies or steps you can take before your session in order to avoid any discomfort.

 

Most medical professionals don’t have training or a background in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Your doctor may be cautious or uncomfortable with answering questions related to healing methods like cupping.

Some CAM practitioners may be particularly enthusiastic about their methods, even suggesting you skip over conventional medical treatments advised by your doctor.

But if you do choose to try cupping as part of your treatment plan, discuss your decision with your doctor. Continue with regular doctor visits related to your condition to get the best of both worlds.

Cupping therapy isn’t recommended for everyone. Extra caution should be taken for the following groups:

  • Children. Children under 4 years old shouldn’t receive cupping therapy. Older children should only be treated for very short periods.
  • Seniors. Our skin becomes more fragile as we age. Any medication you may be taking might have an effect as well.
  • Pregnant people. Avoid cupping the abdomen and lower back.
  • Those who are currently menstruating.

Don’t use cupping if you use blood-thinning medication. Also avoid cupping if you have:

  • a sunburn
  • a wound
  • a skin ulcer
  • experienced recent trauma
  • an internal organ disorder
 

Cupping is a long-practiced treatment that may help ease the symptoms of both temporary and chronic health conditions.

As with many alternative therapies, keep in mind that there haven’t been extensive studies performed without bias to fully assess its true effectiveness.

If you choose to try cupping, consider using it as a complement to your current doctor visits, not a substitute.

Here are some things to consider before beginning cupping therapy:

  • What conditions does the cupping practitioner specialize in treating?
  • What method of cupping does the practitioner use?
  • Is the facility clean? Does the practitioner implement safety measurements?
  • Does the practitioner have any certifications?
  • Do you have a condition that may benefit from cupping?

Before beginning any alternative therapy, remember to let your doctor know that you’re planning to incorporate it into your treatment plan.

 

#IntegrativeMedicine #Hijama #Cupping #Al-Ihsaan #BookNow #Leicester

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Clinic

Coleman Road Clinic
109 Coleman Road, LE5 4LE

0116 484 9748

info@alihsaan.co.uk

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